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LITURGICAL CALENDAR 2017 with Carmelite Feastdays

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The  calendar  is  based  upon  the  General  Roman  Calendar,  promulgated  by  Pope  Paul  VI  on February 14, 1969, subsequently amended by Pope John Paul II, and with the supplement of the Carmelite Feast-days. This calendar has been updated to reflect the names and titles of the various liturgical days in conformity with the Roman Missal.

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Liturgical Year A

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The liturgical year begins with First Sunday of Advent, which starts four Sundays before Christmas (December 25). In this Liturgical year, 2017, Circle A, the Church meditates on the Gospel of Matthew and uses it for most of Sunday readings  (St. Luke for Circle B and St. Mark for Circle C). St. John, who appears several times in the Liturgy of the Word of almost all three years, is offered in a special way during the time of the Lord's Passion.

The Way of the Cross with Carmelite Saints

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prepared by Carmelite Vocation and WebTeam

THE CARMELITE SAINTS in their prayers and reflections reveal a deep communion with the Passion of Jesus. In the light of Christ crucified they beheld the depths of the heart of God and discovered there as well the meaning of the human heart.

One of the most fruitful practices of Christian piety is known as The Way of the Cross (or Stations of the Cross), a devotion that in all probability dates back to the era of the first Christians.

Letter of the Prior General for the Feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel 2017

Letter from Fr Fernando

Fernando Millán Romeral O.Carm.

 

Dear brothers and sisters of the Carmelite family:

          The feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel is approaching and, like every year, I want to send you an affectionate greeting with my most sincere congratulations.  I hope that the feast and all the celebrations of these days (novenas, processions, religious and cultural events, etc.) will be an occasion to honor Mary under this title so popular and endearing and so dear to all of us Carmelites.  May these celebrations touch our hearts, inspire our living of the charism, and transform our lives so that we become more and more faithful to the values of the Gospel.

Be a Brother, Be a Prophet

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Carmelite Youth Group
Curinga, Italy

"The root of brotherhood, then, is faith, adhesion to the plans of the Lord, to his way of living and dying. And the fruits of brotherhood are freedom, joy, peace." This quote from the reflection of the Carmelite youth group in Curinga, Italy will help the Carmelites and those who want to follow the Carmelite Charism experience the values of the Carmel Call - vocation.

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Be a Brother, Be a Prophet

Carmelite Youth Group
Curinga, Italy

Lenten Meditation

Lent meditation

Monica Traynor, TOCarm.

It is St. John who tells us that Our Lady was present at the Crucifixion. (How she bore herself, what she said — if, indeed, she spoke at all, is not recorded. We are free, therefore, to meditate on what may have been her thoughts...
“My Son, my Son, hast Thou forsaken me?
Bone, blood and soul formed from out of me, Grew then in time with me to perfect Prime,
Now broken hangs, dishonoured and despised-
Long have I prepared for this, since aged Simeon spoke;
Often witnessed death, assisted those who died. But never, until this,

Why pray, today?

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Kilian Healy, O. Carm. Prior General

Something strange is happening in the Church today. We are told people are praying less. Time and again many young people, even in religious life and in our seminaries are asking the question: Why pray?

The Carmelite Marian Tradition: The Seventeenth Century

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Matthew Sprouffske, O. Carm.

Another great Carmelite Marian writer of the seventeenth century was Father Stephen of St. Francis Xavier, famed especially for his interest in Carmel’s Third Order. In his Exhortations Monastiques, a series of conferences touching on all things Carmelite, Father Stephen has left us a clear description of the relationship which must exist between Our Lady and the Carmelite.

Brothers of the Blessed Virgin Mary

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Charles Haggerty, O. Carm.

We often hear and read the title of the Carmelite Order. Here we wish to explain it and show its significance and appropri­ateness. But that we might best understand it, we will have to consider it according to the mind of the people of the Middle Ages. For it was during the Middle Ages that the Order was forced to defend not only its title, but its very existence.

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As Carmelites We live our life of allegiance to Jesus Christ and to serve Him faithfully with a pure heart and a clear conscience through a commitment to seek the face of the living God (the contemplative dimension of life), through prayer, through fraternity, and through service (diakonia). These three fundamental elements of the charism are not distinct and unrelated values, but closely interwoven. 

All of these we live under the protection, inspiration and guidance of Mary, Our Lady of Mount Carmel, whom we honor as "our Mother and sister." 

 



by Dr. Radut