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LITURGICAL CALENDAR 2017 with Carmelite Feastdays

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The  calendar  is  based  upon  the  General  Roman  Calendar,  promulgated  by  Pope  Paul  VI  on February 14, 1969, subsequently amended by Pope John Paul II, and with the supplement of the Carmelite Feast-days. This calendar has been updated to reflect the names and titles of the various liturgical days in conformity with the Roman Missal.

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Liturgical Year A

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The liturgical year begins with First Sunday of Advent, which starts four Sundays before Christmas (December 25). In this Liturgical year, 2017, Circle A, the Church meditates on the Gospel of Matthew and uses it for most of Sunday readings  (St. Luke for Circle B and St. Mark for Circle C). St. John, who appears several times in the Liturgy of the Word of almost all three years, is offered in a special way during the time of the Lord's Passion.

The Way of the Cross with Carmelite Saints

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prepared by Carmelite Vocation and WebTeam

THE CARMELITE SAINTS in their prayers and reflections reveal a deep communion with the Passion of Jesus. In the light of Christ crucified they beheld the depths of the heart of God and discovered there as well the meaning of the human heart.

One of the most fruitful practices of Christian piety is known as The Way of the Cross (or Stations of the Cross), a devotion that in all probability dates back to the era of the first Christians.

The Ecological Originality of Pope Francis

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Fr. Eduardo Agosta Scarel, O.Carm.

Soon we will reach the first anniversary of the launching of the much awaited and much critiqued encyclical Laudato Sì (hereafter LS) of Pope Francis, on the care of the earth, our common home.

Carmelite Mission in Ukraine

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Fr. Roman Dabrowski O.Carm.

Sasiadowice is an old village located half way between Chyrowa and Sambor in the Ukraine. The first historical references to this village occur in the year 1370. The wooden church of the Roman Catholic

Carmelite Mission in Hong Kong

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Fr. Heribertus Heru Purwanto, O.Carm.

Carmelite mission in Hong Kong started over 30 months ago.  The actual members involved are three priests from the Indonesian Province. They are Heribertus Heru Purwanto, Paulus Waris Santoso,

Letter of Carmelite Nuns to St. Mary Magdalene de’ Pazzi

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Carmelite Monastery of Janua Coeli

Dearest Maddalena,

we have written a few lines for you. We speak to you as sisters to sister, crossing the boundaries of time to reach you right there where your are now, in the bosom of the Trinity. In your life on

“God of Infinite Mercy” in the Mystical Writings of St. Mary Magdalene de’ Pazzi

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Fr. Charlò Camilleri, O.Carm.

The anniversary of the birth of St Mary Magdalene de’ Pazzi, 450 years ago, could not be celebrated in a more appropriate year than this Jubilee Year of Mercy! We can truly call this saint as being the singer of Divine Mercy:

St. Mary Magdalene de’ Pazzi - Biographical profile

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Sr. Marianna di Caprio, O.Carm.

The second of four children, Caterina was born in Florence on the second of April, 1566, to Camilo de’ Pazzi and Maria Buondelmonti. In the comfortable setting of a noble family, that began to call her Lucrezia, after her paternal grandmother, the young girl grew up peacefully and with a certain sensitivity to the aesthetic side of her social condition.

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As Carmelites We live our life of allegiance to Jesus Christ and to serve Him faithfully with a pure heart and a clear conscience through a commitment to seek the face of the living God (the contemplative dimension of life), through prayer, through fraternity, and through service (diakonia). These three fundamental elements of the charism are not distinct and unrelated values, but closely interwoven.

 



by Dr. Radut