Skip to main content

Solitude in Carmelite Life

Dear Sister,

What aspect of Carmelite Spirituality do you find most helpful for your prayer?

Dear Friend,

The short answer to your question is solitude.

Here is the longer answer…

Since all prayer begins with adoration, the environment surrounding my prayer must be one of solitude where my faith is rekindled as I seek Him whom my heart desires. It is only through withdrawal from the many voices that bombard us throughout the day, the endless demands made

Read more
Lenten Message of our Holy Father Francis 2014

He became poor,
so that by his poverty you might become rich
(cf. 2 Cor 8:9)

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

As Lent draws near, I would like to offer some helpful thoughts on our path of conversion as individuals and as a community. These insights are inspired by the words of Saint Paul: "For you know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though he was rich, yet for your sake he became poor,

Solitude and Carmelite Spirituality

Solitude is not the same as isolation. The latter is an unhealthy withdrawal from human society; a turning in on oneself that is only too often a trait of neurosis. Solitude, in contrast, is a healthy turning toward one's beloved."Solitude,

The Solitude of Carmelite Prayer

So I say now that all of us who wear this holy habit of Carmel are called to prayer and contemplation. This call explains our origin; we are descendants of men who felt this call, of those holy fathers on Mount Carmel who in such great solitude and contempt for the world sought this treasure, this precious pearl of contemplation. (IC.5. I .2)'

Lectio Divina - Christ's central place in this Process

Christ, the only mediator between God and man

When we are doing Lectio Divina, that is to say when we open ourselves to listen to God, we are facing Christ. Christ is the Word the Father has given to us, his only word, and he asks us to listen to himself attentively. Christ, who is both God and man, is the only mediator between God and us.

"Thy Kingdom Come" in Jesus of Nazareth and The Way of Perfection

Their Respective Reasons for Writing

It should be kept in mind that in his Foreword, Benedict XVI describes his book as his personal search “for the face of the Lord” (Ps. 27:28, and as “in no way an exercise of the magisterium,” adding, “Everyone is free, then, to contradict me.”  He considers the Lord’s Prayer for what it shows about Jesus’ claim to divinity, about Jesus' claim to be one with the Father, and for what else it tells us about who Jesus is.

The Face of the Lord in Jesus of Nazareth and The Way of Perfection

Pope Benedict XVI's Foreword says this his writing in Jesus of Nazareth is “in no way an exercise of the magisterium,” adding, “Everyone is free, then, to contradict me.”  These posts discuss both their similarities and differences between them.

Deliver Us From Evil

The last petition of the Lord’s Prayer is “Deliver us from evil.”

---------*******---------*******---------

shieldOCarm

As Carmelites We live our life of allegiance to Jesus Christ and to serve Him faithfully with a pure heart and a clear conscience through a commitment to seek the face of the living God (the contemplative dimension of life), through prayer, through fraternity, and through service (diakonia). These three fundamental elements of the charism are not distinct and unrelated values, but closely interwoven. 

All of these we live under the protection, inspiration and guidance of Mary, Our Lady of Mount Carmel, whom we honor as "our Mother and sister."